Lokathula

Lokathula

Two special eating treats in Victoria Falls Town are to go for afternoon tea at the Victoria Falls Hotel, a colonial affair, and to go to The Boma for a traditional experience. While our visitors were here we had to do both.
We had left Muchenje Lodge, Botswana, in the morning and headed to Zimbabwe. It was a pleasant drive through the park and spent some time in Kasane shopping. Then it was over the border at Kazungula and into Zimbabwe. Again we were in protected areas – fi rstly Matetsi Safari Area and then Zambezi National Park. We didn’t see much along the road but it is so pleasant to drive through ‘wilderness’ rather than villages. Victoria Falls Town is about 60-70 km so it didn’t take time and we headed straight up to Victoria Falls Safari Lodge and their lodges at Lokuthula where we were booked. The lodges are ideal for families and groups. They have three bedrooms, kitchen and lounge. The lounge opens up onto a patio – great for morning coffee. It was perfect for us. Having off-loaded our bags we got back into the car and off to Victoria Falls Hotel for afternoon tea.

The Flagpole at Victoria Falls Hotel

The Flagpole at Victoria Falls Hotel

Our waiter was Wilbert who offered us one or two ‘tiers’. Not sure what we were getting we ordered two. While waiting for our tea we toured the hotel looking at all the old photos, the tram and the view … All so historic.
Our ‘tiers’ arrived and we found that they were stacks of plates covered with tiny sandwiches, scones and cakes. Because we were on holiday and did not care about putting on weight we tucked in. Wilbert had also brought us some Tanganda tea which he praised to the heavens telling us that it was grown in Zimbabwe.

High Tea

High Tea

Feeling very full of tasty treats we headed back to Victoria Falls Safari Lodge for a sundowner! We sat out on the deck and watched the sun set as elephants, kudu, warthog and marabou storks entertained us at the waterhole. As soon as it was dark Sue noticed a hyena below the deck. This was an animal we had not ‘ticked’ off on our trip, so an important sighting. The hyena had come to snack on any bones left over from the vulture lunch – the hotel feeds the vultures every day at 1pm with leftover meat from the kitchen.
After sundowners it was time to prepare for dinner! After a quick shower we walked over to The Boma and joined many, many others who had come to participate in the traditional meal and entertainment. The Boma is a large thatched restaurant. It can serve over 350 guests at one time. The evening we were there, the waiter told me they had 215 guests … when they have a full house, they have to open the second kitchen. Opening the second kitchen happens between July and December, he told me. First we were offered some chibuku, … we all duly took a sip and then gave the mugs back to the waiter. Thank you, but no thank you, we all decided. A starter was brought, mine was pork knuckle terrine. Nice. Then it was time to join the queue for the main course. Many chefs were behind fires, turning all sorts of meat. Apart from the usual beef and sausage, there was kudu, warthog and impala meat. After loading our plates with meat we moved on to the pots of rice, mealie meal, potatoes and lots of sauces. There was also table covered in salady stuff.

The Boma

The Boma

While we tucked into our meal, a dance troupe came onto the floor to entertain us. I was not sure what tribe they were supposed to be – looked to me a bit of a mix of Matabele and Tonga. Most of the diners seemed to enjoy their performance which included a mock fight.
After our main meal had fi nished a drumming group arrived on the floor – the highlight of the show. Possibly a hundred drums were given out to the guests who were to have a drumming lesson. Taking them step by step, the drummers-to-be were shown various techniques. It was lots of fun for everyone. It made the evening one to remember. Sadly, after all our dining that day we did all go over to the cake, pudding and sweets table to indulge … ooo… what a day of food … I will have to diet for a month to get over it all ..

From : The Livingstone Weekly

By Jill Staden

25 June 2014