Crocodile attacks local fisherman at Kuburi Camping site, Lake Kariba

Crocodile attacks local fisherman at Kuburi Camping site, Lake Kariba

At around 1500hrs on the 24th of May 2013 at Kuburi Camping site close to the Crocodile Farm, a fisherman who was fishing with almost half of his body in the water was attacked by a crocodile whilst fishing in Lake Kariba.

 

 

 

 

The fisherman who has since been identified is reported to have been fishing next to his friend who pulled him from the heavy crocodile jaws but sustained some deep cuts on both of his thighs. He was later taken to a local hospital where his condition is reported to be stable.

Investigations reveal that the fisherman (fish-poacher) was fishing illegally since he had not paid anything to Parks for his fishing activity.

A reaction was quickly made by Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority rangers from Nyanyana camp resulting in the shooting of the crocodile.

 Fast facts about the Nile Crocodile:  
 Nile crocodile  Largest crocodilian in Africa
 Average length  3.5 to 5 metres (male)
 Average weight  275 to 550 kilograms
 Length under water  Up to 30 minutes if threatened
 Speed underwater  Up to 30 km / hr.
 Bite force  Up to 5 000 lbf
 Number of teeth (cone-shaped)  64 to 68
 Average lifespan  70 to 100 years

 

Awareness campaign programmes will continue to be held in the area with the Authority warning people to desist from engaging in illegal poaching activities as there are dangers associated with the practice.

The Authority further warns the public to desist from fishing with part of their bodies in the water as water bodies are legitimate residential areas for crocodiles and hippos among other dangerous aquatic species.

It is easy to become complacent on and around our many lakes and dams, and especially so at Kariba. Many is the time, I and others, nonchalantly wade into the water while launching or retrieving boats, or indeed while fishing. How close, and how many times has danger been lurking only metres away? I shudder to think.

From: www.zimparks.com

Date: 31 May 2013